by Monya Baker

Healthy and cancerous stem cells protect their DNA

Recent studies in cancer treatments point to an ugly truth: the best cells to destroy are the most resistant to attack. Work in several human cancer types indicates that only a subset of cancer cells is capable of regenerating tumours when transplanted into mice. Michael Clarke of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, one of the first researchers to identify such a subset in a solid tumour1, hypothesized that these cancer stem cells would be less susceptible to chemotherapies than the other cells in the tumour.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers have identified a new biological marker present in the urine of patients with prostate cancer that indicates whether the cancer is progressing and spreading.

In experiments reported in the February 12, 2009, issue of the journal Nature, the scientists identified 10 metabolites that become more abundant in prostate cells as cancer progresses. Their studies showed that one of these chemicals, sarcosine, helps prostate cancer cells invade surrounding tissue.

BY LAURA BEIL

New field of epigenetics may hold the secret to flipping cancer's "off" switch. Longtime cancer researcher Jean-Pierre Issa, MD, recalls the evening in May of 1992, when he sat in a San Diego hotel room leafing through the program for the American Association for Cancer Research annual conference. Among the thousands of presentations listed, he spotted only two that mentioned epigenetics. One of them was his.

Some colon cancers are destined to spread to the liver and other parts of the body, whereas others are successfully treated by surgical removal of the tumor. Now, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators have found that the ability of a colon tumor to metastasize arises early in its development.

Those colon cancers that spread carry the ability to metastasize from the time they become cancerous, the researchers found. They don't need to acquire any new genetic mutations to become metastatic. The research also suggests that once a colon carcinoma develops, if it is going to spread outside the colon, it will do so in less than two years.

Subcategories

1.    Talk to a macrobiotics counselor.
2.    Participate in a workshop.
3.    Share in a comprehensive professional macrobiotic consultation.
4.    Practice your individually planning program. Written by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

We have 64 guests and no members online

This news service is provided by Good Samaritan Institute, located in Santa Rosa Beach, Florida.

WE PUBLISH PEER_REVIEWED SCIENCE
GSI is a non-profit dedicated to the advancement of medical research by improving communication among scientists.